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perry hall computer repairAre you worried about the security of your Computer and your data? Want a worry free computing experience?

Perry Hall Computing offers a Total Care plan

 

With our Our Total Care Plan you will get

  • Managed Anti-Virus software
  • Unlimited free virus removals
  • Reports are run every hour to check for infections, Windows services stopped, Hard Drive space and health, and other critical components
  • Daily update checks for Windows and third party security updates (java, flash etc)
  • Daily automated mini-tune up to keep your customer’s computers running smooth
  • Sneaker ware Prevention – Automatically chooses “No” during software installation for additional software (toolbars, adware etc)
  • Website Filtering – Blocks known attack sites, and other categories the customer requests such as Adult sites etc..

Only $21.00 Per month be safe , secure and have your computer running at peak performance

BIZ CARD

Reality: Someone May Be Snooping Your Network

Baltimore WiFi SecuritySince 1999 we have been offering onsite computer repair I’ve come across countless open Wifi networks. If you use a laptop or other wireless device in an urban area you’ve seen them too. Some networks are set up this way to allow others in the neighborhood to share an Internet connection (though your ISP may frown on this). Others because the person lives far enough away from anyone that they believe distance protects them from hackers or the like. After all, sometimes your Wifi signal doesn’t reach much further than the walls of the house.

The problem is that when your network is open pretty much everything you do on your computer is visible to anyone else on that network, if they know how to look for it. And, while you may not be able to see your wireless network very far beyond the borders of your home, most of the people who want to snoop on your connection have much more powerful antennas that allow them to connect over great distances. It’s also not just your data that you need to worry about. You can also be hurt by what the person connecting to your wireless does with your Internet connection.

The good news is that securing your wireless network is a fairly easy and straight forward process. The reality is that most people who want to do bad things with your wireless connection are looking for an easy score. They will likely see that your network is protected and just move on to greener pastures.

Perry Hall PC Repair Wireless Security Service Special

For Only $89 We will come to your home and secure your wireless network to keep your network activity safe from prying eyes. With an Un-secured wireless network your Banking activity, online purchase information is up for grabs
$89 is a small price to pay for peace of mind

 

Computer Repair of Baltimore

The Never ..And I mean Never Do List – How To Keep Your Computer Safe

perry hall computer repairWhile it’s true that the internet is full of viral menace, it doesn’t have to feel like an overwhelming or unavoidable thing. There are things that you as a user should do to reduce your chances of contracting a virus on your home computer or laptop – or rather, things that you should not do. For Affordable, Flat Rate Computer Repair in Perry Hall, Maryland contact us Perry Hall Computer Repair

 

When it comes to viruses and malware, you probably already know the basic “Do’s”: do use a reliable anti-virus software, do update your computer and all its software regularly, do take it to a professional if you run into any viruses despite your best efforts. So today, we have a list of “Don’ts” that might help you sleep better at night, knowing that you’re not exposing your computer or devices to unnecessary internet plague.

The Never ..And I mean Never Do List:

  1.  Don’t ever give anyone who contacts you remote access to your computer. I don’t care if it’s a phone call, an email, or the pony express – you should never trust a company who wants remote access to your computer. Remote access allows someone to do just about anything they want on your computer from another location; it can be helpful for people who need to access their office computer from home occasionally, but for most people, it isn’t something they’ll ever need to do. A recent scam we’ve heard about: a person who claims to work at Microsoft calls to tell you that your computer is infected with a virus, and that they need access to save your computer and your files. You panic, give them the information and access they need, and suddenly a stranger has the ability to control your computer, download dangerous malware, and hijack your personal information. Luckily, this scary scenario is easy to avoid: don’t ever let anyone you don’t know access to your computer – remotely or in person!
  2. Don’t open email links your friends share with you until you double-check with them. We all get emails from our friends with funny photos, stories, news articles, or videos. Often you’ll need to click on a link to get to what your friend wants to share – but a little voice in the back of your head wonders, “How do I know this is safe to click on?”  Don’t ignore it! Even if the email is from your best, most trusted friend on the planet, that doesn’t mean it isn’t a trick. Hackers often gain access to an email account, and then email a dangerous link out to all those friends in the address book – disguised as a funny photo or video link. The only way to be sure your friend really sent it is to check with them before you click on it. And if you’re getting spam emails from a friend’s email account, let them know so they can change their password ASAP!
  3. Don’t click on links in emails. This might sound extremebut if you’re a better-safe-than-sorry kind of person, it’s a solid rule to live by in the email world. If you’you’ve kept on top of email scams and spams, then you already know never to click on a link from someone or some business you don’t know. But these days you need to take it a step further. Say you get an email from your bank or your cable provider, and it has a link in it that you want to check out. Better to type the company’s URL into your browser, and navigate to whatever offer or page you wanted to look at from their homepage. Trying to tell a scam email and a legit email apart can be very difficult – scammers have really stepped up their game and can construct an email scam that looks just like a legitimate message from a company you trust, right down to the logo.
  4.  Don’t download files that end in .exe, .vbs, or .lnk. These types of files can open programs or applications on your computer when you download them, and you might never even notice them running. They could be programs that capture your passwords, track your keystrokes to get private information, or even use your computer for their own purposes (most likely not benevolent, I think we can assume). Familiarize yourself with the extensions you are likely to see for common file types: .jpg or .png for images, .doc or .pages for documents, and so on. If you get an email from a friend that says “Look at this great photo I took,” but the attachment ends with .exe and not .jpg, you should steer clear of it.

These are just 4 of the many, many things you should not do on the internet or in your email – but they all boil down to, essentially, erring on the side of caution. We all want to be trusting, open-minded people, but you will be rewarded for being a skeptic on the internet.

Keep these pointers in mind when you browse or use email, and share them with others who might also be losing sleep over their computer’s safety and security.  Computer Repair in Baltimore, Maryland

www.PerryhallComputerrepair.com

 

Your Worst Computer Nightmare – CryptoLocker

Baltimore PC RepairRansom ware is a variety of malware that, once it infects its host-machine, at least says it’s encrypted the data on or locked its victim’s machine in some other way. The malware then informs the infected user that he or she must pay a ransom in order to unlock their files. Of course, there is never any guarantee whatsoever that paying the ransom will unlock anything. In this case the Cryptolocker really carries out the threat, The virus encrypts files stored on local hard drives and mounted network drives using public-key cryptography, and then displays a message saying that the files will be decrypted by a 2048-bit RSA key pair if a fee is paid through an anonymous payment service by a specified deadline, beyond which decryption is no longer possible.  There is no way to decrypt the key.

US-CERT issued an advisory this week warning businesses and consumers of the risks presented by CryptoLocker, which has been on the radar of security experts since late October. US-CERT said infections are on the rise and urge victims not to pay the ransom, instead report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center.

How the virus works – What does it steal from you? Who does it Target?

CryptoLocker installs itself to the Documents and Settings folder on your system and then proceeds to search for specific file types like Microsoft Word Docs or Adobe PDFs. It applies an asymmetric encryption which requires both a public and private key to unlock. The public key is stored in the virus itself and is used to encrypt the files. The private key is hosted on the hacker’s server.

We have noticed a high infection rate here in Baltimore County as well as the surrounding metro Baltimore area.  This is serious business for these thugs and for the first time this type of attack is being considered organized crime.

How do I get it?

  • As an email sent to company addresses pretending to be from customer support from FedEx, UPS, DHL, etc. The virus is attached to the email, usually labeled as a tracking number.
  • In PDF documents that are attached to emails.
  • Via hacked websites that can exploit computer vulnerabilities to install the infection.
  • Through Trojans that pretend to be programs you need to download in order to watch videos online.

Some versions of CryptoLocker are reportedly capable of affecting not only local files but also files stored in Removable Media such as USB sticks, external hard drives, network file shares and some cloud storage services that are able to sync local folders with online storage. The US-CERT notification also warns that the malware can jump from machine to machine within a network and advises that infected users remove affected machines from their networks immediately.

Can Baltimore PC Repair remove the virus?

computer-maintenance-services-Baltimore-Perry-Hall-PC-RepairThe techs and engineers here at Perry Hall PC Repair have had success with removing the virus but at this point it is impossible to retrieve the encrypted files so honestly the best practice is to wipe the hard drive and start over.

 IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

  • Beware of attachments – Always look at your attachments. If you get an email with an attachment from any sender you don’t personally know don’t open it. If you get an attachment from people you do know, but it isn’t something they would normally send, don’t open it. For all other attachments, try confirming that the file attached is in fact legitimate by asking the sender.
  • Backup your data – Be sure to always backup your data on a regular basis. If you backup files on a daily or even weekly basis and are infected, you can easily wipe your hard drives and start again without losing much in the way of data.
  • Know what to do if infected – If you are infected the first thing you should do is disconnect from the network to limit the chance of the virus spreading to other systems. If you have backed up your system and data, you can probably revert your system. If not, your best plan of attack would be to contact us to see if we can help, as we may be able to get around the encryption or even delete it

Computer Repair in Baltimore Maryland

Shop Safely This Holiday Season 4 Quick Tips

baltimore pc repairEven though  Cyber Monday, and Black Friday may mark the high points of the holiday shopping season, but they are by no means the end of it.  In a still struggling economy, with everyone searching for value, consumers will encounter technology deals that might seem too good to be true.

As reported by the Dow Jones news wire, Online shopping may well top $1 billion dollars on a single day this year.  With more and more consumers willing to spend money Online, sales will rise, but so will the risk of exposure to some sort of scam or cyber-crime right alongside those fabulous deals.

So, how can you avoid being taken advantage of?
There are many ways to keep yourself, your privacy, and your money safe this holiday season. But, as the countdown to Christmas grows shorter, many of us abandon our common sense in the desperate pursuit of that one great gift or that one fantastic deal.

Therein lies the problem.  The number one way to guard against Online scams is to employ some common sense.
For example, many of us will go to extreme lengths to save a few dollars.  This often includes venturing off the ‘beaten path’ and looking outside the major retailers on Online auction or classified sites such as E-Bay or Craigslist, which the Better Business Bureau has cautioned against.  While many of the deals offered on such sites are perfectly legitimate, the likelihood of stumbling into a scam is far greater on these sorts of sites.

Tip #1
 If a deal seems too greatit probably is, especially if it’s from an individual user or a ‘minor’ retailer.  Be suspicious of any deal or sale that you can’t believe is real.  Maybe you’ve found the best buy of the season, but it’s more likely that you’ve stumbled into a scam set up to defraud you and steal your money or information.
It’s also important to remember that anyone you do business with Online knows more about Internet commerce — and its dangers — than you do.

Tip #2
Is to do some research about any Online vendor you’re considering making a purchase from.  Some vendors believe quality customer service goes hand in hand with turning a profit.

Tip #3
Consumers would also be wise to investigate other forms of payment, such as Papal or Bill Me Later, a Papal service.  While alternative methods may not offer the convenience of credit cards, they may provide more security against potential scams and those who know how to abuse the system.
Regardless of where and when you shop Online Be cautious

Tip #4
For the online shopper: understand your credit cards.  Broker and other merchants like him, were able to take advantage of customers because of the rules set up by the credit cards those customers use.

With credit card purchases being the dominant form of Online shopping, it’s vital that consumers know the policies of the cards they use and what recourse they have should those policies be abused.

Computer Repair in Baltimore, Maryland

Computer Repair in Perry Hall Maryland

End of The Line For Windows XP Is Coming. What Are Your Options?

Baltimore Computer RepairEveryone mark your calendars, Windows famous operating system XP will cease to be supported by Microsoft on April 8th, 2014. What this means is that Microsoft will no longer release patches or provide any public support in anyway. Are you currently running XP? If so then an upgrade might be worth checking into.

There are some strong arguments that upgrading now would be a good idea. Once Windows XP goes unsupported, then it will become a huge security risk that hackers will be able to crack, and Microsoft will do nothing about it. Using XP after it is unsupported will be incredibly risky and could potentially lead to your data being stolen or you computer becoming corrupted.

Another problem will be that 3rd party software will stop being developed for XP. This leads to users not able to use new software since it won’t be properly designed for outdated technology. For instance, the antivirus you use might not be supported since the company that created it won’t feel obligated to continue to support XP.

So you have a Windows XP machine and are looking to upgrade and stick with Windows. You have two options, going with Windows 7 or Windows 8. Windows 7 is a fantastic operating system, but is quickly losing market share with retailers who will mainly be carrying Windows 8. Windows 7 is still available, but not on every new computer. Windows 8 is a viable option, but has a steep learning curve to it, especially though who are upgrading from XP.

Or you could choose to do nothing, which is an option, but not recommended, especially if you’re a business owner. Businesses who still use XP should be looking into upgrading Windows and training employees soon. Plus businesses will like that new versions of Windows was programmed with security as the focus, where XP it was more of an afterthought. Many residential homes have multiple computers running older technology. Replacing these machines either outright or with a Windows upgrade could become costly and time consuming. Their are estimated stating that around twenty-five percent of all Windows users will still be on XP.

I recommend people start looking into upgrading soon, either to Windows 7 or Windows 8. of the two options Windows 7 would be an easier transition from XP since Windows 8 carries more of a steep learning curve. Plus they both have their advantages being more reliable, better security, and quite a bit faster. Also, Windows have outlined that they will support these operating systems for many years.

Either you use XP or you know someone that does and knowing this information is important to stay protected with your technology. You still got some time but it’s important to start planning now before your XP machine.

Connected PC Solutions –  Computer Repair in Perry Hall Maryland

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